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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 7
CSPAN 6
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
. gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself one minute. i would point out that the f.d.a. has not retracted the use for the short-term use of a rescue inhaler in the treatment of acute asthmatic attacks. that just simply has not happened. to say that congress is now seeking to overrule the f.d.a. is just simply preposterous because that is not the facts on the table right now. regulatory earmark, come on. give me a break. i would welcome another companies into the marketplace that wanted to create a low cost, effective, convenient treatment for asthmatics who need an acute respiratory relief when there is meds, that they take on a chronic basis either are not working or for whatever reason a flareup has occurred. i'm an asthma patient. i'm on asthma medicine. in the product information provided to patients, on the long-term medicine, a statement this is not intended as an acute -- rescue device for an acute attack. for that you need something that was previously available over the counter. there's no reason for congress to tell patients -- i was astounded b
? i yield the floor, senator leahy. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: madam president, what is the parliament situation? the presiding officer: the senate is in a period of morning business. mr. leahy: i thank the distinguished presiding officer. i assume then that we're going back and forth? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: madam president, i would be happy to accommodate other senators, but i came to the floor to speak for about ten minutes on the supplemental. i see senator mccain. i don't know if he came to speak on senator inouye or the supplemental. senator merkley and senator stabenow want to offer an amendment or introduce an amendment. is that appropriate? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. that is appropriate. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would request we do as usual in morning business, back and forth, if that's all right. if i could follow the senator from louisiana? the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: and if the senator would yield, the senat
. quorum call: quorum call: mr. levin: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: madam president, i ask further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that the only additional first-degree amendment remaining in order to the bill be the following: mccain amendment 3262 on syria as modified with changes at the desk, that there then be 20 minutes equally divided in the usual form on the amendment, that any remaining time prior to 4:30 be equally divided between the chairman and ranking member for general debate on the bill, and that at 4:30 all postcloture time be considered expired, the senate proceed to a vote -- to votes in relation to the mccain amendment as modified, that no amendments be in order to the amendment prior to the vote, that upon disposition of the mccain amendment the senate agree to the pending kyl amendment, which is a kyl-kerry amendment, 3123 as modified. that upon disposition of the kyl amendment the senate proceed to a vote
. altmire: thank you, madam speaker. i appreciate it. i will not speak for nearly 60 minutes. i'm tempted to engage the gentleman, my good friend, mr. woodall, in debate, but i won't do that because i know he's still smarting from his bulldog's loss over the weekend and i'm going to let him continue to think about that. i very much enjoy the friendship and camaraderie with mr. woodall, we do have a difference of opinion on some of those issues. before i start, madam speaker, i would say to the group, the individual who will be speaking following my presentation, that i plan to only speak for about five minutes. or less. so this will not be an hour-long presentation. so the speaker who will follow me on the majority side i would recommend they hang near the floor because i will be wrapping up shortly. madam speaker, i rise to commemorate the 50th anniversary of laroche college. founded in 1963 by the sisters of divine providence in mccandliss, pennsylvania, a suburb of pittsburgh, it was named in honor of ma reap laroche, the first superior of the congregation of the sister of divine provi
for the immigration of its citizens, affecting mainly soviet jews. it was controversial in its time. madam president, people said why are we connecting human rights to trade? why is the united states doing that? after all, trade is so important. well, we did it and it made a huge difference, and we were able to get soviet jews out of the soviet union. we spoke for western values in our trade legislation. we protected the rights of individuals that refused this. when i first came to congress 26 years ago, i joined the congressional caucus for soviet jewry. i wore the wristbands. 25 years ago, i marched in washington, a march for soviet jews. we stood up for basic rights, and we changed the landscape on this issue. i had a chance to be with natan sharansky and celebrate what he meant to freedom around the world. we initiated that with jackson-vanik. it's a proud chapter in american history. today we end that chapter because jackson-vanik is no longer relevant to the human rights challenges of our time. but with the passage of the sergei magnitsky accountability act, we meet the challenges of our time.
, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: mr. president, on behalf of senator inouye, the chair would send -- the clerk has reported the bill; is that correct? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. mr. leahy: you have a substitute amendment which is at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. mr. mr. inouye proposes amendment 3338. mr. leahy: on behalf of mr. inouye, i have an amendment to the substitute which is at the desk. the presiding officer: without objection, the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. inouye, proposes an amendment, number 3339. mr. leahy: mr. president, i'm going to speak briefly on this in just a moment. in the meantime, i will suggest the absence of a quorum, but i will call it off very quickly. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy
a question. i do maim madam chairman have questions i would like to submit to the secretary and directer fugate. i don't want to take my time here. with your permission, i'll submit the question and you can get the answers back to us. i want to focus now on not just fundings needing for recovery porks -- portions of the recovery, but i think there's a common theme throughout the morning's testimony by the various senators. it is that how do beget beyond just basic of recovery. to and restoration to really the mitigations aspects? and kind of challenge that we're looking there relative to this what turn out to be an inextraordinary cause when you look at the map that was presented here in terms of the extent of this storm, the population that lives within that red zone, and purple zone, and the density of construction businesses and et. cetera, et. cetera, et. cetera. we're talking about an enormous amount of money and mitigation that would be necessary to bring us to the so-called 21st century protection from what appears to be ever increasingly the devastating storms. we are not talking
supreme court fight. here with me tonight are christine quinn and joy reed. madam speaker, judge scalia is an interesting character. tell me what was your reaction. he cashed in a number of ways, he was making absurd comparison. let's get back to the morality issue. what is the connection between your personal views of morality and your views of the constitution? >> you know, look. he wasn't teaching a law class there. he was making a point, i believe, about what he actually thinks. and the job of the supreme court when they're going to take up this very important matter isn't what they personally think about lgbt people. it is what the constitution sets out as a framework for protecting the rights of americans. that's the question here. and i believe the supreme court is going to rise to that occasion as they have before and look at those important issues. and really the justice should apologize for what he said there. >> what did he say? tell me what exactly he said wrong. besides the way he talked. just the comparison of murder with people's orientation? >> it's offensive. sexual ori
the rates or, madam president, we are going over the cliff. >> i'm reminded of the famous george bush adage, whatever it was, fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, it was actually shame on me. >> that's what republicans are saying exactly this, the white house has opportunities in the future in which it can raise taxes on the wealthiest and it should take those opportunities in order to get us through this crunch period. do the minimum that is possible now to stop us falling over the fiscal cliff, then when it comes to actual tax reform later next year, that will be the white house opportunity. democrats are saying we don't buy that. we're going to do it now, a majority. country supports us doing it and we're going to do it right now. it's a little bit the inverse of the republican argument that if we give you tax hikes now, how do we know we're getting the spending cuts later. democrats are saying the same thing, but in reverse. >> they feel they have the wind in their sails, not only because of the election, but people talk about debt ceiling being leverage. it would not be good for
the fta still involved in that. we will save time and money because we do. >> finally, madam secretary, let me go back to a, you made -- comment you made about having the resources necessary to understand and rely upon so that a community or an individual or a business can make and inform -- make an informed decision, depending upon or relying upon that that decision will be funded at the end of the day. whether the consequences of not having the resources -- what are the consequences of not having the resources under which you would make those decisions? >> the recovery will take longer. as you wait longer, it becomes more expensive. that is why it is critical, and we have seen this time and again with our experiences in mississippi, louisiana, iowa, where, when communities understand the funding they have and are able to plan years down the line -- they take the data they have and are able to plan years down the line. that is critical to know what the resources are right up front. we're going to ask them to plan for recovery based on their unmet needs and based on the funding availab
. >> is there an objection to the original request? >> yes, i reject. -- i object. >> whiplash. >> madame president. >> what just transpired deserves a word. senator mcconnell came to the floor this morning and offered a change in law that would help us avoid the kind of obstruction and the kind of showdowns we have had in the past over the debt ceiling. in fact, the idea was not new. it was his original idea that has been the law of the land that followed. and he offered and challenged senator reid to bring this matter for consideration by the senate. he said he would bring this to a vote in 20 minutes. and we would decide up or down whether the debt ceiling problem would be resolved once and for all under senator mcconnell proposal. and then senator mcconnell objected, say, no, no, we need 60 votes. for those who do not follow the senate, 60 votes is equivalent to a filibuster vote. so this may be a moment in senate history when a senator made a proposal, and when given a opportunity for a vote, he filibustered his own proposal. i think we have reached a new spot in the history of the senate we have never
address that. senator mikulski. >> thank you, madam chair. >> if your not careful coming will have a mikulski and that is worse. trust me. you'd be happy to have one. >> am i not right, senator murray? >> that can be my next one. really, i want to they and you and the ranking member. this has been a great hearing. what you bring his experience in this area as the senator from louisiana and there is a great sense of compassion and also reform. we have a big job but if we could work together, we could institute reforms, responds in a very creative, compassionate way and keep an eye on the bottom line. i think that is what the people in the country and those affected would want us to do. right now, there is heartbreak in maryland. what i do want to comment on quickly are some of the things that are working. we do want to thank the president for quickly issuing the declaration of a general disaster -- a general disaster declaration. we thank secretary napolitano. i speak to her availability. fema, you have been on the job. we really want to thank you for that. the problem is the indivi
for the record, and thank you. >> thank you, administrator. madam secretary? >> good morning. chairman men endezz, members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my roll as deputy assistant secretary for grant programs at h.u.d., i am responsible for the community development program, the cbdg, the cbdg is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work that h.u.d. has started and will continue through cdbg for long-term recovery. additional details on these points and on secretary donovan's role as head of the president's sandy recovery task force are provided in my break-in testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed have had massive and varied impacts along the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island, especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of our nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to home and apartments and displacement of families and
should defeat coburn. mrs. feinstein: well, thank you very much, madam president. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: thank you, mr. president. one of the things that i have learned in chairing the energy and water subcommittee, which is the committee that handles appropriations for the army corps of engineers, is how really difficult it is to get projects started, funded and constructed. and so i am one, particularly in view of storms, earthquakes, floods, damages, that you also need to do the mitigation because once it happens once, there's a heavy likelihood that it could happen again. so i rise in opposition to this amendment. the provision that the senator from oklahoma proposes would essentially take a project that's authorized, that has gone to the corps for study -- i beg your pardon? the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mrs. feinstein: may i ask for two minutes additional time, please. the presiding officer: is there objection? without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you very much. would essentially take a corps project that ha
the rest of the statement for the record. thank you. >> madam secretary. >> good morning, chairman menendez, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my role as to the secretary of grant programs with hud i am responsible for the community development's block grant program, the disaster recovery grant and home program. the disaster recovery program is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters like superstorm sandy. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work had has started and will continue for long term recovery in the region. additional details on these points on secretary donovan's role as head of the sandy recovery task force are provided in witness testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed had massive and very impact on the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island. especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of the nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to homes and apartments and individuals, ex
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15